Slipknot News Feed

Slipknot News Headlines

Drum-Cam Footage Of São Paulo Concert
SLIPKNOT's JAY WEINBERG: Drum-Cam Footage Of São Paulo Concert
Slipknot parted with Joey for 'Necessity'
COREY TAYLOR: SLIPKNOT Parted Ways With JOEY JORDISON 'Because Of Necessity'
Slipknot debut XIX music video
Slipknot Debut new Music Video 'XIX'
Alex Venturella Recovering Well
Slipknot Bassist Rushed to Hospital in Middle of Connecticut Show

Slipknot Latest News

Drum-cam footage of SLIPKNOT's Jay Weinberg performing with his bandmates on September 27 at Arena Anhembi in São Paulo, Brazil can be seen below.

Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News

Living Out Loud - LA recently conducted an interview with SLIPKNOT and STONE SOUR singer Corey Taylor. You can now listen to the chat using the SoundCloud widget below. A couple of excerpts follow (transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).

On SLIPKNOT's split with drummer Joey Jordison in December 2013:

"I mean, it was hard at first. Nothing worth doing is ever easy right out of the gate. When we parted ways with Joe, it was honestly because of necessity; he was going one way and we were going another, and we just couldn't go that way anymore. And honestly, that's all I can really say about it. But I can tell you that starting to move on without him was one of the most difficult things we've ever done. I mean, just as hard, in a lot of ways, as trying to move on without Paul [Gray, late SLIPKNOT bassist]. But, like anything, it takes those first couple of steps, and then it gets a little easier. It doesn't get better by any means, by any stretch of the imagination, but it gets easier. With the new guys , it's really kind of a 2.0 kind of situation, where it's the second phase of SLIPKNOT's career, basically. And it's different. In a lot of ways, it's more fun, but in a lot of ways, it's bittersweet; it really is. Because you've got two dudes who you kind of went to the trenches with, and you stood on shoulders to kind of get to where you were, and then you lose one and then you have to split with another. And it's hard, man. It's difficult at times. Because you've got two great dudes who you're jamming with right now, but they don't understand a lot of the sacrifice and the toil that went into a lot of it. But at the same time, they have such respect not only for the band, but the music and what we're doing, because they're fans — they started out as fans and they grew up listening to us. So they have absolute respect for what this band is and what it stands for. And they have never asked for too much, stepped on the wrong toes… They are very respectful, and that's huge for us. Coming from Iowa, respect is a big thing, and they have shown it at every stage of the way. So that, in a way, has also made it a little easier for us."

On whether SLIPKNOT felt any pressure while making last year's ".5: The Gray Chapter" album:

"This band is… It's just very unique, and it always has been. There's still a lot of people out in the world who just don't understand what this band is about, and that's kind of fine, because as long as we know, it doesn't matter what anybody else thinks. And I think in a lot of ways, that's why we've been as resilient as we have been. Because we're very aware of what the identity of the band is. Just because a lot of people have a misconception of what this band is about, it doesn't change how we feel about it. And when you have that kind of strong foundation, everything else just kind of balances. We were nervous going into the studio, sure, but we knew we were going to do something special right out of the gate. It might not have been what people expected, but at the same time, we're a band that, if we're not happy with something, we don't release it — straight up. If we don't back it, we're not putting it out there. That's not say that, in retrospect, some of our stuff has been… To us, hindsight is always 20/20, so you look back at some of the stuff you've done and you're, like, 'Hmmm… I don't know about that.' But, for us, in the moment, it's what we're all about. So there wasn't a lot of pressure. It was more pressures for us that we put on ourselves, just to make a great album that we would wanna listen to. We really never paid attention to the outside stuff. It's never gotten in. I mean, that's one of the reasons why we recorded 'Iowa' the way we did, and it's also one of the reasons why we turned around and did 'Vol. 3' the way we wanted fo — just because we wanted to do it that way. So, for us, we've always been very resilient, and maybe, again, this is the reason that we work the way we do. Coming from the Midwest, we've never shied away from hard work — ever. It's one of the reasons why we dug our heels in right out of the gate and were able to establish ourselves on the first album. It's because we never shied away from the work, 'cause that's what it's all about. But the other side of that is that this band is so different. I can't describe what this band is. It's never been easy for me to describe, because, on paper, we should never have made it in the first place. I mean, it's true: we never should have. People should have looked at us and just been, 'What in the fuck is going on here?' On paper, we don't sell four million copies of the first album. It just doesn't make any sense. But this band is different, and we beat all the odds. And I think that's why we continue to beat the odds — because we're just different, man…. Whether you look at this band as theatrical or creative, there's just something that resonates with this band. And whether people hate us or love us, they respect the fact that, after sixteen years, we're still doing it, and we're still doing it bigger than we ever did. I mean, it's insane."

On how he manages to stay involved with so many different projects:

"It's exhausting sometimes, but I'm also the guy that, if I'm not into it, I don't do it — straight up. If I can't find my satisfaction in something, then I pass on it. I've turned down so many different things — different opportunities, different projects and whatnot — just because not only could I not find my place in it, but also because I just don't have the time. And I know that if I don't have the time, I'm not gonna be able to do something to the best of my ability. So, as crazy as it is, I'm able to do a lot of different stuff because I actually have the time to kind of focus on it — whether it's writing books or making albums or touring, or whatever. And honestly, I've gotten to a point in my life where I can afford to bring my family with me, which is a whole different thing. So it's very, very rarely that I don't have my family with me, so I'm very lucky in that respect. And that helps. Just having them to come home to, whether it's walking from the stage to the bus, or pulling up and getting them to bed, it's all good."

".5: The Gray Chapter" sold 132,000 copies in the U.S. in its first week of release to land at No. 1 on The Billboard 200 chart.


Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News

Slipknot Debut new Music Video 'XIX'

posted on 06 Oct 2015

SLIPKNOT's music video for "XIX", the opening track from the band's 2014 album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", can be seen below.

SLIPKNOT percussionist Shawn Crahan constructed the song as a three-minute eulogy for the band's founding bassist Paul Gray, who died in May 2010 of an accidental overdose of morphine and the painkiller fentanyl. Crahan spoke the song's opening words, "This song is not for the living; this song is for the dead." But it's the lyrics that frontman Corey Taylor wrote that drove him to tears: "Walk with me, just like we should have done right from the start.... Walk with me, don't let this fucking world tear you apart."

"I don't usually let people see me cry," Crahan told Rolling Stone magazine. "It's too hard. But when I heard what Corey Taylor sang on the song 'XIX', I cried and cried and cried. It hurt so bad."

Taylor explained the song's title to Kerrang!: "It's pronounced 'XX', but it's supposed to represent a couple of different things," he said. "It's the 19th year of the band's existence, and it's also a metaphor for stage two, because track one on the 'Iowa' album was '515', and this is 'XIX', So in Roman numerals it's almost like a double of that. So it represents a new start, and seeing where the road leads to."

Taylor added: "Lyrically, it's really about getting back up on your feet after getting smashed in the mouth, basically. It's just kind of the start of, you know, what would become to me the second stage of the band's career."

Corey told Kerrang!: "What you hear on the record is what we did on the very first demo. It's all me, all raw, in one take, the first time we recorded it."

The last single released from "The Gray Chapter" was called "Killpop".

SLIPKNOT's "Summer's Last Stand" tour kicked off on July 24 in West Palm Beach, Florida, and wrapped on September 5 in Dallas.


Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News

Update: Slipknot have issued an update on the health of bassist Alessandro “Alex” Venturella, who has been discharged from the hospital. It reads as follows:

After a medical emergency during last night’s show, we are relieved to let everyone know that our bass player, Alex ‘V-Man’ Venturella, is well on the road to recovery. Alex collapsed mid-set after feeling unwell and as a precautionary measure was taken to hospital where he was found to be suffering from severe dehydration. After recuperating overnight, he has now been discharged from hospital and is on his way back to his Slipknot family. All being well, Alex will be back onstage with us tomorrow in Mansfield, MA. We thank everyone who reached out with messages and well wishes for Alex and we look forward to be being back at full tilt for the rest of the Summer’s Last Stand tour.

Original Story Continues Below:
Slipknot‘s new bassist Alessandro “Alex” Venturella suffered an undisclosed medical emergency in the middle of Slipknot’s set in Hartford, Conn., last night (Aug. 2). The band stopped the set for 20 minutes, but returned to the stage to continue the show as an eight-piece band.

Upon resuming the show, frontman Corey Taylor addressed the crowd (watch above), saying, “I’m gonna let you know what’s going on right now. I’m sorry to say that our bass player, Alex, had… Something happened. I’m not sure what happened. He’s been put into an ambulance and he’s going to the hospital right now as we speak. But I want you all to make f—ing noise for him. Send him some f—ing love. Now, we had a choice to come back out here. We’ve had to modify some s–t, but we’re gonna keep on playing for you. It’s what we want, it’s what Alex would f—ing want.”

Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News

Metal Hammer caught up with Slipknot's Jim Root at Rock On The Range to talk about the future of the band and what else he's got in the pipeline.

Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News


posted on 23 Mar 2015

Clive Police have charged Mickael Thomson, the guitarist of Iowa heavy metal band Slipknot, after an arrest earlier this month involving a knife fight with his brother.

After an investigation police concluded that Mickael Thomson, 41, and his brother Andrew Thomson, 35, were both responsible for the March 11 assault, which hospitalized both of them.

Both have been charged with disorderly conduct by fighting. The brothers were booked and released on a promise they will appear in court March 30. Both parties declined to seek charges against each other.

Clive police were dispatched to the home of Mickael Thomson on March 11 after receiving reports that two brothers had been fighting. According to a news release, an altercation started inside the home, then moved outside where the brothers began physically fighting.

According to police, when they arrived on scene, both brothers seemed to be intoxicated and had sustained injuries from the fight, with Mickael Thomson receiving a stab wound to the back of the head.

Both were taken by ambulance to be treated for nonlife-threatening injuries.

Slipknot Metal: Slipknot News

<< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 13 ... 15 ... Next >>